[Blabber] Lots of soldering, tips and tricks?

A Barton bartona at gmail.com
Sat Sep 9 17:47:08 UTC 2017


Lots of liquid flux, a panavise to hold your boards, tin your tips, a good
professional iron.

I would look up how J-STD certified technicians do their work.  There are
techniques for different joints. Or maybe see if you can hire one.

Also check out IPC 610 standards for pictures of inspecting your work.  At
least you'll get an idea of what a bad joint looks like.


On Sat, Sep 9, 2017 at 1:23 PM Isaac (.ike) Levy <ike at blackskyresearch.net>
wrote:

> Wow, thanks all!
>
> Sounds like the 1 crucial thing I was missing: FLUX.
> Just scored a tub at my local BK hardware.
>
> Jig: I just grabbed 2x heavy small slate tiles I've stashed, setting
> that up as a fast holding jig.  So simple, obvious now.
>
> I've got a trusty hot iron, and I just dug out some more blunt tips I
> accidentally ordered years ago!  Luck, I think that will help.
>
> Now to it, heads down...
>
> --
> Come winter, I was thinking of making more of this project, maybe as a
> kickstarter- (I know there are at least 10 places in the world wanting
> what I'm making ha).  I may shout back asking about where in China to
> get components assembled!
>
> Yet, from this experience: if I was starting from scratch- I would never
> have chosen to use these LED strips.  I'm making a very large 7-segment
> display, with individually controllable segments, and 10 characters
> total.  RGB strips are simple and cheap, but now I'm sure it would have
> been faster/simpler/cleaner to use bare RGB LED's and learn Eagle or
> something to produce a PCB to hold them- SO MUCH EASIER, probably
> similar cost in the end.
> Lesson learned- the sanest path to hacking up a project idea is not
> always apparent at the start :)
>
> Thanks again all!  Now I really want to come to a Hack Manhattan open
> night sometime just to bring a box of doughnuts for all you helpful folks
> :)
>
> Best,
> .ike
>
>
>
> On 09/09/2017 12:02, Guan Yang wrote:
> > Four suggestions:
> >
> > 1) Work faster ;-)
> >
> > 2) Send it to China. There are shops that will do it for not that much
> money.
> >
> > 3) Based on that picture, you might be able to build a jig easily. I'm
> picturing a block of wood or metal that:
> >
> > - has a channel or something to fit the LED strip, maybe with an easy to
> use clamp; maybe just a wood surface, and two pieces of dowel nailed and
> glued down where the LED strip would slide into.
> >
> > - some kind of clamp for the LED strip, possibly just a heavy block
> >
> > - has channels or a set of pins or nails to hold down the cable. As a
> simple solution, I would clamp the wire a few centimeters to the left in
> that photo, and 5 pins so each wire slides into a specific position.
> >
> > 4) Buy a box of donuts, come into Hack Manhattan on an open night, and
> recruit people to form an assembly line for you.
> >
> > What is your exact soldering process? I would probably do this:
> >
> > 1. Apply a decent amount of solder to each of the 4 contacts on the
> strip. Maybe do this first for a big batch of strips, it'll be faster that
> way.
> >
> > 2. Twist each of the 4 wires, apply flux, apply a little bit of solder,
> then a little extra flux. Perhaps one of those cans of flux that you can
> dip the wire end into.
> >
> > 3. Heat up the previously applied solder blobs and move each fluxed wire
> into the heated blob.
> >
> >> On Sep 9, 2017, at 10:59, Isaac (.ike) Levy <ike at blackskyresearch.net>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Hi All,
> >>
> >> I'm that lurker from Brooklyn, hoping my question is OK here,
> >>
> >> Can anyone point me to any tips for soldering lots of wires at scale?
> >> Like making jigs for soldering, or tips for holding the material, or
> >> tips for how to apply solder to expedite things?
> >>
> >> I'm soldering up a project with a big chain of high power shift
> >> registers, soldering more than I've ever soldered in my life.  As an
> >> amateur, I'm competent soldering components to boards- but now, I have a
> >> *lot* of wires to solder down and I'm fumbling through it too slow.
> >>
> >> For anyone curious, I'm driving 12v LED strips from TPIC6B595 shift
> >> registers.  My LED strips RGB, the cheap kind that are common these
> >> days.  I have nearly 200 strips to solder to, (4 wires each, at least
> >> the wire I have is a strip of 4 wires), Pictures attached.
> >>
> >> Thanks- any thoughts much appreciated!  (Even if your only suggestion is
> >> 'work faster' ha).
> >>
> >> Best,
> >> .ike
> >>
> >>
> <FullSizeRender.jpg><IMG_1819.JPG><IMG_1822.JPG>_______________________________________________
> >> Blabber mailing list Blabber at list.hackmanhattan.com
> >> https://list.hackmanhattan.com/listinfo/blabber
> >>
> >> Unsubscribe: https://list.hackmanhattan.com/options/blabber or send a
> blank email to blabber-unsubscribe at list.hackmanhattan.com
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Blabber mailing list Blabber at list.hackmanhattan.com
> > https://list.hackmanhattan.com/listinfo/blabber
> >
> > Unsubscribe: https://list.hackmanhattan.com/options/blabber or send a
> blank email to blabber-unsubscribe at list.hackmanhattan.com
> >
>
> _______________________________________________
> Blabber mailing list Blabber at list.hackmanhattan.com
> https://list.hackmanhattan.com/listinfo/blabber
>
> Unsubscribe: https://list.hackmanhattan.com/options/blabber or send a
> blank email to blabber-unsubscribe at list.hackmanhattan.com
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <https://list.hackmanhattan.com/pipermail/blabber/attachments/20170909/25b207b0/attachment.html>


More information about the Blabber mailing list